Wednesday, June 29, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A SOCCER FIELD DIAGRAM IN MS WORD PART 2

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 21  PART 2

TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW SOCCER FIELD DIAGRAM IN MS WORD

TYPE:   COLOURED ILLUSTRATION / DIAGRAM              

Hello, readers. In this second part, I’ll demonstrate how the drawing is created. All you need to do is to draw 7 rectangles, 6 arcs, 3 circles, and a line. Fill the big rectangle with Green colour. Remove the graphic colour or fill of all other drawing objects by doing the following: Click to select the drawing object > Fill Color > No Fill. When the drawing is completed, change the colour of the lines to white. The contrast between the light and dark colours makes the white lines stand out in the picture.


(B)  THE DISSECTED SOCCER FIELD DIAGRAM





Thursday, June 23, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A SOCCER FIELD DIAGRAM IN MS WORD PART 1

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 21  PART 1


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW SOCCER FIELD DIAGRAM IN MS WORD

TYPE:   COLOURED ILLUSTRATION / DIAGRAM              

There are many methods to draw a soccer field diagram and drawing it in MS Word is just one of them. Football coaches and Physical Education teachers can use this diagram to teach game tactics and strategies. It will be even more interesting if this is done in PowerPoint. A presentation with visual effects such as labels and notes appearing from various styles and directions enlivens the briefing session or lesson. Three shapes were used to create this diagram. They are Rectangle, Oval and Arc. I hope that this drawing meets the standard soccer field specifications. If it doesn’t, I wish to apologize.


(A)  THE SOCCER FIELD DIAGRAM



Friday, June 17, 2011

HOW TO DRAW SQUIDS SWIMMING IN MS WORD PART 2

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 20 PART 2


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW SOME SQUIDS SWIMMING IN MS WORD

TYPE:    FINE ART – DIGITAL LINE DRAWING  

(B)  THE DISSECTED DRAWING  

© Chang Hon Woon 2011

A total of 258 drawing objects were created to form this digital drawing. Each squid was created with 70 drawing objects. Imagine that each drawing object is drawn on a piece of clear plastic transparency. Do you know how thick the pile of transparencies will be when they are stacked together to form the picture? The thickness will be more than half a ream of typing paper. But by using the Select Objects tool, all these individual transparencies or layers that move independently can be grouped into a single unit. This tool is quite cool, don’t you think? By the way, this feature is also found in other professional computer graphics software.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

HOW TO DRAW SQUIDS SWIMMING IN MS WORD

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 20 PART 1

TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW SOME SQUIDS SWIMMING IN MS WORD

TYPE:    FINE ART – DIGITAL LINE DRAWING              


One of the advantages of digital drawing is that you can create multiple copies of the same subject and then do some alterations or editing here and there to make the copied images look different. Look closely at the digital drawing above and you can see that I had made some changes to two other squids to make the three squids look different. With these, I created a fine art drawing depicting squids swimming below the surface of the ocean. You can also see sunlight shining through the water’s surface. The entire drawing can be created using the Curve, Scribble and Line tools. The Scribble line tool was used to draw the ocean's surface viewed from below. Art Education teachers can also use this drawing to teach the Elements of Design such as Line, Form and Space. For example, when teaching the concept of space, distance has an influence on the size of the subjects. The squid in the foreground looks bigger whereas the one in the middle distance looks a bit smaller. The third squid in the background looks smallest. Well, you can do many things with the image of the squid digitally except eating it!

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A SQUID IN MS WORD PART 3

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 19 PART 3


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A SQUID IN MS WORD

TYPE:    FINE ART – LINE DRAWING

(C)  THE DISSECTED DRAWING OF THE SQUID                                                          

I’d made some alterations to the first drawing and this is how the squid should look like. As usual, I’ll dissect the drawing to show how all the drawing objects are joined to create the picture of the squid. Don’t forget to merge all the layers into a single unit using the Select Objects tool. Yes, the principle of grouping all the separate drawing objects into a single unit is similar to other professional image-editing software. Once merged as a unit, the image can also be separated again by applying the Ungroup command.

Can you count how many drawing objects are there? Believe it or not, the squid is created by joining all the drawing objects together. By the way, the organic shape in dashed line is used for masking. In my next post I’ll show readers how to create a fine art digital drawing composition with this subject.

Sunday, June 5, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A SQUID IN MS WORD PART 2

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 19 PART 2


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A SQUID IN MS WORD

TYPE:    FINE ART – LINE DRAWING

(B)  DRAWING THE SQUID IN MS WORD                                                      


It took me quite a while to realize that squids actually swim like that, with the tentacles section facing forward. I found that out when I read the National Geographic magazine. This magazine is splendid for studying the physical details of nature’s flora and fauna. I don’t mean that we copy the pictures wholesale. When we draw or paint pictures of subjects such as plants, insects, reptiles, fish and mammals, we do need to know some details, right? I believe that anything that nature designs has its purpose and as for the squids, by swimming that way, enables them to swim much faster and catch their prey easier. As usual, try drawing this picture on your own first using the Curve line tool and I’ll disclose how the drawing is done in my next post.

 

Friday, June 3, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A SQUID IN MS WORD

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 19 PART 1



TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A SQUID IN MS WORD
TYPE:    FINE ART – LINE DRAWING

(A)  PRODUCE A PENCIL DRAWING OF THE SQUID                                                    

I always produce preliminary pencil drawings or sketches of the subjects first before I draw them in MS Word. This enables me to study the physical nature of the subjects before I produce the final drawings digitally. I once came across a picture of an old antique car in the newspaper and produced a sketch of the car. After that, I drew the picture of the antique car in MS Word. I can say that it was the most difficult drawing that I have ever attempted in MS Word. Actually, digital fine art drawings can also be mounted and displayed like any other works of art. Here is the pencil drawing of a squid and I would like readers to try to draw this squid using only the Curve line tool in MS Word. This tool is capable of drawing curve and wavy contour lines.  I will show how it is done later.


Thursday, June 2, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A PIE CHART IN MS WORD PART 2

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 18 PART 2


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A PIE CHART IN MS WORD

TYPE:   MATHEMATICS DIAGRAM

(A) Creating the guide                                                                  

To create a pie chart which uses percentage as the value, you need to divide it into sections and when all the sections are added, the whole value is 100%. I have a suggestion on how to make the division of sectors much easier and accurate as you can see in the diagrams below.

First, find the centre point of the circle and the divide the circle into 4 parts (25% each) or 8 parts (12.5% each). Use the Line tool to make the guide lines. These lines are not intended to be visible and therefore they have to be deleted afterwards.

 

(B) Creating the pie chart
I used only three tools to create the pie chart. The Oval tool was used to create the circular shape and the Freeform line tool to create the sectors. Finally, I used the Donut shape to mask or conceal the areas outside the circle.


I discovered the method to mask unwanted areas from view when I wrote my first computer graphics book about the subject of drawing pictures with MS Word in 2002. Without the masking technique, the pie chart created in this manner could not be done. I find this method very useful and I have created many types of drawing with it.
Here is the completed diagram and readers can also experiment with other methods. After all, this is only one of the many methods.