Tuesday, July 26, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A LIGHTED CANDLE IN MS WORD PART 2

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 23  PART 2


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A LIGHTED CANDLE IN MS WORD

TYPE:   GRAPHIC DESIGN

(A)  HOW TO DRAW THE PICTURE?

The drawing is dissected to show the various drawing objects created with the tools mentioned in Part 1 that formed the picture. Let’s start with the shapes first. As the saying goes, ‘A picture says a thousand words’. So you see that the contents on my blog do not contain thousands of words. Instead, I prefer to let the pictures do most of the 'talking'.


Sunday, July 17, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A LIGHTED CANDLE IN MS WORD

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 23  PART 1


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A LIGHTED CANDLE IN MS WORD

TYPE:   GRAPHIC DESIGN

This design can be used in many ways. I’m just trying to show how this illustration is created in MS Word. Sometimes when there is a blackout in my area due to power failure, I will light up some candles to lighten the place up. I like to put the candles on metal container covers and tin cans. Hence, this experience gave me the idea for this graphics project. The picture below shows a lighted candle placed in a tin can filled with sand. You can also see that the candlelight is in four subtle shades of yellow. How do you create these tonal values?

        Here are some tips for readers to try drawing this at home. The tools needed to create this drawing are as follows: Oval, Can, Curve line, and Rectangle. By the way, make use of the Fill Effects and More Fill Colors options to add shading and decorative effects to the illustration.



Friday, July 8, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A FLYING WILD GOOSE IN MS WORD PART 3

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 22  PART 3

TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A FLYING WILD GOOSE IN MS WORD

TYPE:   FINE ART – DIGITAL LINE DRAWING               

(B)  THE DISSECTED DRAWING OF THE FLYING WILD GOOSE

Well, don’t you think that drawing pictures in MS Word is like assembling a toy model set? This picture of a flying wild goose is formed by joining or putting together 44 drawing objects (lines and shapes) which are stacked in relevant positions. Use the Draw > Order command in MS Word 2003 or Format > Arrange > Send to Front / Send to Back commands in MS Word 2007 to adjust the position of the lines and shapes. Don’t worry if some readers are still using Microsoft Word 97. So far, all the drawing projects that I have featured on my blog can be drawn in MS Word 97. If assembling toy model sets is fun, try this for a change. I actually got addicted to it, so to speak.



Monday, July 4, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A FLYING WILD GOOSE IN MS WORD PART 2

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 22  PART 2

TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A FLYING WILD GOOSE IN MS WORD 

TYPE:   FINE ART – DIGITAL LINE DRAWING               

(A)  THE DIGITAL DRAWING OF THE FLYING WILD GOOSE

As you can see, I created and manipulated the lines and shapes and then stacked them together to form the picture. In the next post, I’ll dissect the drawing to reveal how the drawing is done. In the meantime, try drawing this on your own.


Saturday, July 2, 2011

HOW TO DRAW A FLYING WILD GOOSE IN MS WORD PART 1

MICROSOFT WORD DRAWING PROJECT No. 22  PART 1


TITLE:   HOW TO DRAW A FLYING WILD GOOSE IN MS WORD

TYPE:   FINE ART – DIGITAL LINE DRAWING               

I have another drawing project that uses the Curve line tool. Below is a hand drawn picture of a wild goose. Try to draw this picture in MS Word using only the Curve line tool. The lines or shapes created can be fine-tuned with the Edit Points tool. Manipulate or adjust the vertexes around them to produce the desired shape or line. Here are some tips. Start by drawing the head. Then, draw the goose’s body. After that, draw the tail section. Finally, draw the wings.

         Art Education teachers can use this drawing project to teach FORM which is one of the Elements of Art. As you all know, forms are three-dimensional images or objects whereas shapes are two-dimensional.  Something that has only one dimension like either length or width or height is known as one-dimensional.  Something that has two dimensions that consist of length and breadth but not depth is known as two-dimensional. Therefore, a two-dimensional shape is flat because it doesn’t have depth. Something that has all the three dimensions is known as three-dimensional. Forms have all these three dimensions (length, width, and height) and therefore have depth. Images that are three-dimensional look realistic. Finally, only superhumans have the ability to see things four-dimensional. Since we are all normal people, we must content ourselves with the ability to see things in three dimensions.



                                     One-dimensional            Two-dimensional          Three-dimensional
                                                                                    (Shape)                            (Form)